TAR Course Updated to Add Video on Step Seven and the All Important “Stop Decision”

e-Discovery Team ®

We added to the TAR Course again this weekend with a video introducing Class Fourteen on Step Seven, ZEN Quality Assurance Tests. ZEN stands for Zero Error Numerics with the double-entendre on purpose, but this video does not go into the math, concentration or reviewer focus. Ralph’s video instead provides an introduction to the main purpose of Step Seven from a work-flow perspective, to test and validate the decision to stop the Training Cycle steps, 4-5-6.

The Training Cycle shown in the diagram continues until the expert in charge of the training decides to stop. This is a decision to complete the first pass document review. The stop decision is a legal, statistical decision requiring a holistic approach, including metrics, sampling and over-all project assessment. You decide to stop the review after weighing a multitude of considerations, including when the software has attained a highly stratified distribution of documents. See

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FCA US LLC v. Cummings – It’s Not Perfect, but It Does Need to be Better

TAR eDiscovery orders and opinions have made some pretty big splashes in the last five years, and the recent FCA US LLC v. Cummings, Inc., order, despite being brief, was no exception. The court took up the question of whether keyword search culling of a data set prior to the application of Technology Assisted Review (i.e., TAR or Predictive Coding) is the preferred method. The answer, in the court’s opinion, was simple but powerful: it is not.

Some have described this decision as a “nightmare.” Others have less vividly decried it as likely to impede much needed progress in the use of advanced analytics. While I understand the causes for concern, I find it hard to disagree with the court’s decision based on my understanding of the relevant judicial precedent and the gravity of the flaws associated with keyword search culling.

Personally, I don’t believe that TAR judicial history to date, apart from the circumstance and proportionality based rulings in In re Biomet (Apr. 18, 2013) and Bridgestone (July 22, 2014), support another outcome….

See the full post at the Altep Blog: FCA US LLC v. Cummings – It’s Not Perfect, but It Does Need to be Better

 

Substantial Reduction in Review Effort Required to Demonstrate Adequate Recall

Clustify Blog - eDiscovery, Document Clustering, Predictive Coding, Information Retrieval, and Software Development

Measuring the recall achieved to within +/- 5% to demonstrate that a production is defensible can require reviewing a substantial number of random documents.  For a case of modest size, the amount of review required to measure recall can be larger than the amount of review required to actually find the responsive documents with predictive coding.  This article describes a new method requiring much less document review to demonstrate that adequate recall has been achieved.  This is a brief overview of a more detailed paper I’ll be presenting at the DESI VII Workshop on June 12th.

The proportion of a population having some property can be estimated to within +/- 5% by measuring the proportion on a random sample of 400 documents (you’ll also see the number 385 being used, but using 400 will make it easier to follow the examples).  To measure recall we need to know what proportion…

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